Clavicle Bone Anatomy

Author: Scott A. Sheffield MS

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Introduction to Clavicle bone anatomy:

The clavicle or collar bone (os clavicula) is located superior to the first rib and runs horizontally from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula.

Anterior view of the upper half of the skeleton until the pelvis.
Anterior view of the upper half of the skeleton until the pelvis with the humerus, sternum, clavicle and scapula labeled.
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  • A superior view of the clavicle shows it is shaped somewhat like an “S”. The medial end curves anteriorly and the lateral end curves posteriorly.
Anterior view on the upper half of the skeleton until the pelvis.
Anterior view of the skeleton with the clavicle bone magnified and its anterior and posterior curvatures labeled.
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  • Along with the scapula, the clavicle forms the shoulder or pectoral girdle, which connects the humerus (arm) to the axial skeleton.
  • The clavicle functions like a strut or lever arm to help support (suspend) the humerus and scapula and maintain their position relative to the rib cage.

Try revising the anatomy of the clavicle with flashcards. They’re one of the fastest and most efficient ways to study!

  • It is often difficult to determine the correct orientation of a disarticulated clavicle due to its relatively small size and few distinguishing markings.

 

Pectoral Girdle – Right

Clavicle Bone Marking:

  1. Sternal or medial end (extremitas sternalis) is the rounded end of the clavicle that articulates with the manubrium of the sternum. [image descriptionIllustration/ image descriptionSuperior View]
  1. Acromial or lateral end (extremitas acromialis) is the flattened end of the clavicle that articulates with acromion of the scapula. [Inferior View/ Superior View]

Learn the anatomy of the clavicle and surrounding structures with these interactive quizzes and labeled diagrams.

  1. Conoid tubercle (tuberculum conoide-um) is a bump on the inferior surface of the bone, near the acromial end. It is an attachment point for the conoid ligament. The conoid ligament is a part of the coracoclavicular ligament, which attaches the clavicle to the coracoid process of the scapula. This prominence also serves as a useful landmark to identify the inferior surface of the clavicle.
  1. Trapezoid line or ridge (Linea trapezoid) is an elevation that runs obliquely from the conoid tubercle to the lateral end of the clavicle. It serves as an attachment point for the trapezoid ligament, which is also a part of the coracoclavicular ligament mentioned above.
  1. Costal tuberosity (Impressio ligament costoclavicularis) is a roughened oval elevation on the inferior surface of the bone, near the medial (sternal) end. It serves as an attachment point for costoclavicular ligament, that attaches the clavicle to the costal cartilage of the first rib. This marking is also called the impression for costoclavicular ligament.
  1. Subclavian groove or sulcus (sulcus musculi subclavii) is an indentation that runs horizontally along inferior surface of the bone, from the costal tuberosity to conoid tubercle. The sulcus, which is also called the groove for the subclavius, serves as an attachment point for the subclavius muscle.